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"Do you want to make a lot of money?" Err…

Some “what I’ve learned in 2007” from Robert Scoble, a popular tech and media blogger:

“11. When people were courting me to join them invariably they’d pitch me with “do you want to make a lot of money?” I always hesitated on that question. Why? I know lots of miserable wealthy people. The right question? “Do you want to have a ton of incredible experiences and great friends?” Now THAT I can say yes to, and do often.” -( more here)

Has the promise of big money (part time, no less) sustained the huge majority of people who responded to the big money pitches in the MLM field?

Yes, I know the promise of big money sells, so the promoters will continue. Yet some of the biggest business successes of our age led with a person or two who had ideas they wanted to implement first, and THEN the money came (founders of Apple, of Google, etc.)

Are the values our business is constantly promoting the reason for its failure?

About the author

Kim Klaver

10 Comments

  • I agree. Most people who do something for the money only aren’t very happy.

    People must have a passion, whether it is a passion for network marketing itself, passion to have the opportunity to stay home with your children, or a passion for something else.

    Good New Year’s Post!

  • There is nothing wrong as long as there is no promise made that the person can do it.

    There is a potential for the NM to create Millionaire, but there is a price to be paid and need time to do that.

    As most people want money for various reasons, they will response to that baits.

    It is the promise someone will make a lot of money witin certain time frame tht causes people to have bad taste of NM.

    On top of that, it is not the money that causes miserable, money is only a vehicle, it is the owner of the money that create problem for themselves.

    By the way if you chase after money, you are not going to get it. Only when I started to add value in people life then money will flow in

  • While I don’t personally know Robert Scoble, I will assume that he was already in a good spot when people would approach him to make big money.

    In other words, he was having a fun time doing what he was doing, and would only consider something else to have more fun.

    Unfortunately, most people aren’t in that position.

    They hate their jobs. They hate their boss. They hate the commute. The hate the stress. They have no job security. Etc.

    For these people, what do you think will be more effective?

    “Hey, do you want to do something fun that will cost you $200 to join and take up the rest of your free time?”

    Or . . .

    “Hey, do you want to make enough money so you can escape that miserable job and actually start doing some fun things that you’ve always wanted?”

    I think the latter resonates with most people.

    Walter Reade (from Wisconsin)

    I’ve finally found a product I can share easily!

  • Hi Walter: You write: “Hey, do you want to make enough money so you can escape that miserable job and actually start doing some fun things that you’ve always wanted?”

    It resonates, yes. But if what the people are asked to do is unpleasant to them (hit up your friends to sell), or it takes much longer than they were promised, how long will they continue doing it? Aren’t those the two things that make nearly everyone quit, despite the promises of money?

    I’d bet that most network marketers are not having fun with their business. Between the stress of the unexpected no’s, the nagging upline, the monthly minimum purchases, etc. and the elusive income (even a few hundred a month eludes almost everyone), it’s an unhappy situation for most folks.

    There has to be a better way to recruit people, than with offers of money in a short time frame, which almost no one achieves, think?

    Sigh.

  • Walter:

    Your own ad-link in your signature here sort of screams that someone can earn “big money” selling your drink. 🙂

    What’s that “big money” defined as? What does someone earn if they sell a bottle? And what is the cost to a consumer of one bottle? Don’t sell me, just tell me those two things. What do you earn on a bottle, and what’s the cost to a consumer for a bottle? 🙂

  • Kim:

    I’d bet that most network marketers are not having fun with their business. Between the stress of the unexpected no’s, the nagging upline, the monthly minimum purchases, etc. and the elusive income (even a few hundred a month eludes almost everyone), it’s an unhappy situation for most folks.

    Sure, but that’s assuming everyone is teaching network marketing the old school way.

    I personally don’t.

    And that’s what makes it so much fun.

    Over the holidays, I got three new customers and a new rep. It was all done “New School” and felt great.

    There has to be a better way to recruit people, than with offers of money in a short time frame, which almost no one achieves, think?

    The team I’m with emphasizes a 5 year plan, but adjusts to the prospect’s skill level and what they are willing to do to achieve that.

    I personally don’t want any “get rich quick with no effort” people, regardless of what package they’re willing to join at.

    And I’ve never liked the “You can make $16,000 in four months!” approach. It’s at best unethical and at worst dishonest.

    Your own ad-link in your signature here sort of screams that someone can earn “big money” selling your drink. 🙂 What’s that “big money” defined as?

    That’s up to the prospect. They tell me what they want to earn, and I tell them what they have to do to earn it.

    What does someone earn if they sell a bottle?

    BOTTLE?! Why would we sell an energy drink in a bottle? Yikes. There are already too many of those.

    We sell them in packets. People can put them in water, orange juice, vodka, or whatever they want. Plus, it makes it really easy to mail samples.

    But, to your question, we sell a box of 100 servings for $75, and the rep makes between $20-30 per box, depending on volume.

    Walter Reade (from Wisconsin)

    I’ve finally found a product I can share easily!

  • Walter – thanks. I know you’re on the right track. I think the ad you use in each post of late identifies you with the old school, screaming big money types.

    $20-30 is not exactly “big money” to some people. Why not just put “Earn $20-30 on a $75 order” if that is a true statement and does not have any other “qualifications” attached?

    Yes, I know, it’s not your ad. Maybe cook up something else to use – not so old school and screamy. You’re pretty good at Internet stuff…

  • Kim I joined my first network marketing company because of the promise of making big money from home.

    Now I’m with a new company and will stay with it because of the incredible experiences and great friends.

    One incredible experience I had on New Year’s Eve: I was able to offer a dear friend an option for helping her sleep and get off the alcohol she has been using to fall asleep. Having a new customer is great but my passion is with helping this friend stop the habit of drinking to sleep. It really scared me when she told me she is up to 2 or 3 drinks a night because the one wasn’t working anymore. I never knew how great I would feel helping someone without even thinking of the money I would make.

    Incredible experiences happen when I have passion for helping others.

    Happy New Year

    Robin

    http://www.Robin.WholeFoodNation.com
    http://www.HealthyPetNut.com

  • Hi Kim,

    The only sources that talks more about money than network marketers are the king and queen, Dave & Suzie, of money talk radio.

    Everyone, and I mean everyone, treats it like the global hot button. The magical 6 figure income is now talked as a monthly thing , not yearly. Didn’t I hear that only 3% of the American workforce earns over $100,000 annually? It seems most comp plans I have studied have the full time jump off point at around $40 to $70K annually. I wonder if you were able to collect all the 1099’s being sent out to network marketers for 2007, what % would be over $40,000.

    Also, of those that actually earned over $40,000 last year in network marketing, what % actually worked the proverbial 10-15 hours per week ?

    What I am getting at is that time and financial freedom for most never comes any closer to earth than Tinker Bell.

    Kim, you asked, “Are the values our business is constantly promoting the reason for its failure?” For me that is a strong, definite yes. Many have worked hard to build their business part-time, spare-time, exta-time for a long time while juggling a fulltime career and a family. Lots of strain, stress, and tension and it’s still, “I owe, I owe, so off to work I go”. So if you ask them if they have ever tried Network Marketing, you may get a blast of bitterness with a tort, “I tried that. It doesn’t work”. Keep in mind that this could be coming from a college educated professional or a ditch digger.

    Kim, I don’t know the answer, but I am not going to bait prospects with money promises, with no guarranty. You have helped me see the ‘light’ on this point.

    I saw the light,

    Tom Doiron

  • >Are the values our business is constantly promoting the reason for its failure?

    Partially. And it’s a consequence – a symptom of a deeper malaise… the chronic lack of appropriate talent and business-oriented behavior.

    More importantly, it’s the failure to recognize and correct that shortcoming.

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